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Sony a7R II and Zeiss Batis lenses – Initial thoughts and shots from the coast of Maine

Blasphemy be damned, I’m going to admit that I wasn’t all that excited about the a7R II prior to its release.

I’m a simple stills guy so the 4k video is wasted on me; I also like my fat pixel 12mp a7S files just fine, thank you and I dreaded having to deal with both the processing and storage requirements of a 42mp image. Furthermore, I already enjoy the refreshed body style and IBIS on the a7 II and I’m not a switcher – been shooting Sony for a few years now and sold all my Canon L lenses long ago.

My prior detachment aside, the release of this camera is a watershed moment in the mirrorless epoch. The a7R II spec sheet reads like something out of the future, a no compromise piece of kit that is both evolutionary and revolutionary at the same time. Who wouldn’t be interested in this camera? As professionals or even enthusiasts, we desire the best and this camera promises to be that at a great many things. Even if it falls short in a single category like low light (little brother a7S still reigns supreme), its second best still trumps most everything else on the market.

So yeah, I want the best and I want it compact and rugged and efficient and with a great compliment of lenses. I know it will eventually be eclipsed by something newer and greater but at this point in time, I can with a good conscience state that it is the best digital camera I have ever owned.


I’m not going to do a detailed review, many others are far better at that, but I can share some thoughts and photos that I hope will be helpful. All images have been edited from RAW to my personal taste.

In the pro column, the camera is mature. Sony has had time since the release of the a7 (their first full frame mirrorless system camera) to evolve and improve on many aspects of the platform. The menu system is by now second nature to me but more importantly, with the release of the a7R II, Sony has vastly expanded the level of button configuration. Virtually every physical control on the camera has some level of customization. This means that for all but the most arcane settings, there are direct physical controls. We’ve all seen the comments labeling Sony products as computers or gadgets, compared to other brands’ “real cameras”. The truth is that all modern digital cameras, yes I’m looking at you too Leica, are electronic, computer controlled devices. With the a7R II, I can hide that electronic menu interface for 99% of the photography I do while still harnessing secondary features like IBIS, focus magnification or display options with physical buttons. The closest example of this type of physical control from the golden age of the 35mm film world was the Minolta Maxxum 7 (also known as the a-7!) which was laden with physical controls for every imaginable setting. For the uninitiated, Sony purchased Minolta’s camera and lens line in 2006 – check out this report from way back then – Farewell Konica Minolta.

The a7R II is the second camera in the line to be blessed with IBIS or SteadyShot, also a Minolta invention. Once you’ve used IBIS there’s simply no going back. Hand holding a 135mm lens at 1/5th is doable with IBIS and good technique – amazing. For some of the photos here, I used the lovely Batis 85mm which has its own optical image stabilization that works in tandem with IBIS for even greater control. The jittery view of a long lens simply melts away to calm when IBIS kicks in. Sony saves battery life by engaging the IBIS function only when the shutter is half-depressed so you can see the effect in realtime, before and after you engage focus.

The original a7R suffered a heavy shutter action that was quite loud. Having never owned that model, I can’t comment but I will say that the a7R II has one of the sweetest sounding shutters I have heard. It sounds something like this: shhtiiiickkk. Really, take my word, it is wonderful – quiet and refined. Some people have even confused the normal shutter sound with the silent shutter feature which is incorrect as the silent shutter is just that: silent. And on the topic of the Silent Shutter setting, yes there are some compromises such as a restriction to single shot mode but come on, the use cases for silent high speed shooting have got to be minuscule.

Another aspect of the camera that impresses me is the new EVF magnification. At .78 it is the largest magnification of any modern camera, DSLR or mirrorless (the Nikon D810 comes in at .70) which results in a large comfortable view of the scene with excellent eye relief. This feature did have me excited and I’ll have a hard time looking through a view with lesser magnification now.

The autofocus speed seems on par with the a7 II but tracking looks to be improved thanks to the 399 on-sensor phase detect points. I’ll need to do more shooting to be sure and I also want to do some concerts in low light, but for now I’m very pleased. Using the gorgeous new Zeiss Batis lenses for these first shots in Ogunquit, Maine resulted in quick, sure focus on the 25mm, with the 85mm a bit slower (common for longer focal lengths moving more lens mass) but still speedy. I’m finding that the Batis 25mm truly shines on the a7R II – sharp, sharp, sharp right to the corners with manageable distortion and excellent color. The ability to dial in hyperfocal setting in 2 seconds using the OLED is a nice feature that I used often on some of these tourist landscape shots. If you are looking for a top quality standard wide for the a7 platform, this is your lens. Overall, I’m very pleased with this combination and look forward to more options in the Batis lineup.

One of the big features of the new camera is its claimed compatibility (with an adapter) to Canon EF lenses. The previous a7 models also had this compatibility but the AF speed left much to be desired. With the a7R II, Sony is taking a broad shot across Canon’s bow, claiming much improvement, approaching native AF speed using EF lenses. Since I don’t have any Canon lenses I can’t comment with any authority but there seems to be a consensus in early reviews that the performance claims are accurate. Since the a7R II will be the first Sony camera for many Canon switchers I can only implore them to enjoy the compatibility with their existing lenses but do not ignore some of the class leading native FE lenses that are now available.

Back to the a7R II – what about all of those pixels? The good news is that I’m seeing nothing but sharpness, no shutter shock or blurred details – and my MacBook Pro seems to be chugging along just fine so far. I get a longer delay when rendering a 100% view but for standard editing I haven’t noticed any speed bumps. The level of clarity and detail from the combination of this 42mp sensor and the Batis lenses has been simply astounding and will eclipse the performance of many Medium Format systems. Dynamic range has also been top notch and I expect it to be measured in the 14+ stop range at base ISO. Shadow boosting and highlight recovery is child’s play with these Sony sensors and the a7R II doesn’t look to be compromising dynamic range or low light performance for high resolution. Check out the before and after sample below illustrating shadow boost at base ISO.

No camera is perfect and I expect there to be a few niggles here and there but as I mentioned earlier, the a7R II is remarkably mature. As a photographer with some manual focus rangefinder lenses I do find that the new larger EVF has an unfortunate downside that lessens the shimmering effect of the older displays. This effect was from edge artifacts and could help the photographer determine when they had manual focused accurately without relying on focus peaking. The extra EVF magnification eliminates those edge artifacts making it more challenging to determine manual focus accuracy without entering one of the focus magnification modes. Now to be clear, Sony never advertised or even hinted of this EVF shimmering effect as a tool for focus, this is simply a trick that I and others have used for our benefit so we can’t berate Sony for eliminating what some may have thought was an annoyance.

Aside from my gripe about manual focusing with the new EVF, I’ve discovered no significant faults that impact operation or lessen my enjoyment of the camera. My initial impression is that Sony has set a new high bar with the a7R II – a camera that will suit many, but of course not all styles of photography. For those that specialize in landscape, architecture, wedding or portraits, as well as the run and gun videographer, this could well be the one and only camera that you need in your bag. And let’s not forget, that bag is going to be a lot lighter.

22 Comments

  1. […] af lenses on la ea3 by Mike Kobal. High ISO samples at ThePhoBlographer. A7rII and Batis test by Chad Wadsworth. Full Sony A7rII review by Yannick Ciancanelli. Sony A7R II Hot Pixel Issue (Photographylife). […]

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  2. I was originally quite surprised by the strange shutter sound, and though I’m fairly used to it now, it still catches me off guard every now and then. 🙂 Thanks for your thoughts and the lovely first images!

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    1. Thanks Heather! It is a unique sound isn’t it? I really enjoy it.

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  3. Well, no 11mm zoom lens,tilt ans shift lens,8mm fisheye zoom,or radio trigger flash or third party wireless trigger is scant. Questionable customer service.

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    1. Thanks for the comment Abi.

      All of those lenses are available on the a7R II using the Metabones adapter for Canon. I tried it out today at Precision Camera during lunch and was blown away by the AF speed. We compared the AF on the Canon 85mm 1.2L on both the a7R II and the 5Dm3 and couldn’t tell the difference. So until Sony releases their own native versions of those wides and perhaps a Tilt Shift, there are plenty of options.

      As far as wireless triggers go, I use Paul C. Buff and there are systems for Sony from Phottix and Nissin to name a few. I’ve also used Pocket Wizards and cheap Chinese knock-offs. I’ve done professional shoots using a 3 light Profoto setup so I’m not seeing the constraints you list.

      Are you aware of the new Sony Pro Service? It is as good if not better than the Canon and Nikon programs. So far I have been very impressed.

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  4. Hi Chad,

    Thanks for the pictures and the useful write-up.

    2 questions:

    (1) How do you think the Zeiss Batis 25mm/f2 compares with the Sony Zeiss 35mm/f1.4, besides the obvious differences in size, weight, price, and FOV? As an amateur, I am leaning towards the the 35mm as I think it is a bit more versatile for everyday use (wide “enough” for most general outdoor and indoor shots, but at the same time more useful for wide portraits/shots of people). Plus the wider aperture means theoretically it should have better low-light capabilities. The 25 would be better for landscapes, as in some of your pictures, but I am leaning towards trading off that benefit. Any idea how the IQ compares? I suspect the Batis is better, though not sure how much. Any thoughts on this, since I only plan to buy 1 of the 2?

    (2) When you were trying out the manual focus (and focus peaking?), did you notice any issues with clarity or sharpness on the zoom in the EVF? (I did see your comments on the shimmering effects but I have not used an a7-series camera to know what that looks like. I was trying out the camera in a Sony showroom (with native FE lenses), and felt that the manual focus and focus peaking while zoomed in the EVF was not very clear/sharp. I thought perhaps it was just my inexperience but then I’ve seen some comments around the web on this.

    Thanks

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    1. You can’t compare the Batis 25mm and the FE 35/1.4 – they are too different. As an amateur I would suggest you go with the 35mm first.

      On the EVF question, I think that as counter intuitive as it sounds, the extra magnification works against perceiving sharpness when zooming. It isn’t a deal breaker and you can still MF just fine, but for me it is easier to discern when something is in focus on the a7 II or a7S. Personally, I’ll take the larger more comfortable view over the small extra bit of sharpness when magnified.

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      1. Thanks for the quick reply.

        RE: lenses I will probably go with the 35/1.4. It also has the physical aperture ring which I like very much. I guess my main question was on the comparison of relative image quality.

        RE: manual focus, I see what you mean about the magnification vs clarity, thanks.

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  5. A 7ll Battery life?? I get some 130- 150 shots pr charge. Comments please

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    1. Others can comment about battery life but one new advantage Sony added is the ability to charge the camera via USB. So if you have a portable USB battery pack like the ones used to charge mobile phones, you can actually charge the camera’s battery on the go. Brilliant feature in my opinion.

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    2. Wow, that is not the result I’m getting. I used two batteries on the day of the Maine Coast photos and there are over 650 shots in the gallery. I finished the day with about 30% life in the second battery. I use a couple tricks to manage life – 1. Turn on airplane mode if you aren’t going to be using the wifi feature 2. Program a button to turn off the LCD – you wil still see basic exposure settings on the bottom of the screen but the rest will be black. The cool thing about this setting is that if you want to review a photo on the LCD, you just press the play button as you normally would and the LCD turns back on.

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      1. Many thanks, will try that. That is however only some 325 shots pr charge.

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  6. More like 350-400 but again, it depends on your usage. I’m more concerned with getting through the day as opposed to the actual number of shots. Unless you only roll with one battery, it isn’t a concern.

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    1. I am using 2, but considering 2 more if your previous advice does not work. I am sure it will though.

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  7. Great post…Do you think you could share some of your tips+tricks on some of your Settings (custom Fn, keys, etc) you set on the A7RII ? Thank you

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    1. Hey Charles. Great question. I am just about dialed-in but still making a few tweaks. The level of customization is really impressive and I think I have it setup in a way that is effective for my style. I’ll try and do a post sharing those settings soon.

      Thanks!

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  8. Dear Chad, thanks for sharing your thoughts. Great review! Along with the 55/1.8, would you suggest the Batis 25 or the the 35/1.4 (I’m personally leaning towards the Batis as a landscape lens)?
    thanks for your reply

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    1. Hi Dante, sorry about the slow reply. Yes, I would suggest the Batis 25mm to match-up with the 55/1.8. I shoot those two lenses plus the Batis 85mm for a trifecta.

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  9. Hi Chad, great pictures. I currently have a a7ii and was wondering if it will be worth upgrading to the a7rii. As lenses I have the 28mm 2.0 and a loxia 35mm plus Leica adapted lenses. Besides the mega pixels is it really that much better? I guess not that far from now Sony will come with a dual slot camera, so maybe it’s worth waiting.

    Can you share an honest comparison between the a7ii and the a7rii? Thanks!

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    1. Hi Al, thanks. I took a look at your blog – great stuff. So I struggle with these questions because, you know, only you know what your needs are but looking at your work and seeing that you are predominantly a manual focus lens user, I don’t know if the a7RII is going to be much of a difference for you. I always enjoyed the 24mp sensor of the a7II and the EVF, while smaller, is actually a bit easier to use when manually focusing. I’m not sure about you but I skip the peaking and just look for the moire shimmer in the EVF. With the a7II I could see that shimmer more easily than in the RII. Now if you were an autofocus guy or using an AF lens other than the 28mm (which is going to AF great on both cameras), I might push you towards the a7RII. Maybe enjoy your a7II for a while longer and either jump on the next camera or pick up a used a7RII. Good luck.

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      1. Chad thanks for your feedback on my blog, really appreciated specially since I found your work amazing. Thanks for the advice and you are right I think is wiser to stay with the a7ii for now 🙂 Sony might come with something new around the corner, and meanwhile the a7ii is a wonderful camera, just need that 21 loxia to compliment the 35 🙂

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  10. Hi Chad,
    I just bought a Batis 25mm for my A7R2 and am trying to familiarize myself more about this lens, especially about using the OLED to figure out the hyperfocal distance. Would you please tell me how you do it?

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